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ITALY / Milan / Palazzo Reale: Ferdinando Scianna
by Modem
© Modem

until Sunday June 05 2022

T : +39 02 88 44 51 81
piazza del Duomo 12
20121 Milan
Italy

c.mostre@comune.milano.it
https://www.palazzorealemilano.it

The large anthological exhibition, curated by Paola Bergna, Denis Curti, Alberto Bianda (art director), dedicated to Ferdinando Scianna opens to the public on the Piano Nobile of Palazzo Reale in Milan, enriched for the occasion with two important unpublished sections, one dedicated to Leonardo Sciascia and the other, the "Bibliography", which presents a selection of Scianna's books, from the first, “Religious Feasts in Sicily”, which has become rare and precious over time, up to the very latest publications.

With over 200 black and white photographs printed in different formats, the exhibition spans the entire career of the great Sicilian photographer and develops along an articulated narrative path, built on different chapters and various methods of preparation. Ferdinando Scianna is one of the masters of photography not only in Italy. He began to be passionate about this language in the 1960s, narrating through images the culture and traditions of his region of origin, Sicily. His long artistic career unfolds through various themes - current affairs, war, travel, popular religiosity - all linked by a single thread: the constant search for a form in the chaos of life.

In over 50 years of stories, there is certainly no lack of suggestions: from Bagheria to the Bolivian Andes, from religious festivals - the beginning of his career - to his experience in the world of fashion, which began with Dolce & Gabbana and Marpessa. Then the reportages, the landscapes, his thematic obsessions such as mirrors, animals, things. Finally, the portraits of his great friends, masters of the world of art and culture such as Henri Cartier-Bresson, Jorge Louis Borges and in particular Leonardo Sciascia, to whom an entire and unpublished section of the exhibition is reserved.

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Image: Marpessa. Caltagirone, 1987 © Ferdinando Scianna

© Modem